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PC Engine GT

From NEC Retro

PCEngineGT logo.png
PCEngineGT JP.jpg
PC Engine GT
Manufacturer: NEC
Release Date RRP Code
PC Engine
JP
¥44,800

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The PC Engine GT (PCエンジンGT) is a handheld version of the PC Engine released in 199x.

The GT is thought to have been released as a response to Nintendo and its monochrome Game Boy handheld console from 1989. However, rather than create a new platform as Nintendo had done (and Sega with its rival Game Gear console), a decision was made to make the GT a fully fledged PC Engine - that any HuCard games which worked on NEC's home console would also function on this handheld.

In North America a similar, TurboGrafx-16-compatible handheld was released as the TurboExpress. As is the situation with the PC Engine and TurboGrafx-16 home consoles, the internals of the TurboExpress are identical to the GT, but the physical cards in which games were distributed on are different between the Japanese and North American markets - a form of regional lockout. Many accessories are interchangable, however.

The PC Engine GT was not a popular unit in Japan, primarily due to its high asking price, but also performance. Like other colour handhelds of the era, battery life is short (roughly six hours), the screen is not clear, and devices are prone to failure due to defective capacitors (an industry-wide problem in the early 1990s which affected a wide range of electronics, including Sega's Game Gear).

Magazine articles

Main article: PC Engine GT/Magazine articles.

Promotional material

Physical scans

PC Engine, JP
PCEngineGT JP Box Front.jpg
Cover

References


PC Engine
PC Engine (1987) | CoreGrafx (1989) | CoreGrafx II (1991)
X1 Twin (1987) | PC-KD863G (1988) | Shuttle (1989) | GT (1990) | LT (1991)
Add-Ons
AV Booster (1988) | Interface Unit (1988) | Ten no Koe 2 (1989) | Backup Booster (1989) | Backup Booster II (1989) | Ten no Koe Bank (1991) | Memory Base 128 (1993)